Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend World Congress on Cell and Structural Biology Osaka Japan.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Jaleel Kareem Ahmed

Babylon University, Iraq

Keynote: Red Beet Juice and Urine System

Time : 09:15-10:00

OMICS International Cell Biologists Congress  2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jaleel Kareem Ahmed photo
Biography:

Jaleel Kareem Ahmed has his expertise in evaluation in iron and steel industry. He has registered 3 patents in USA, UK and Iraq about using water in iron industry and wax for storage and transportation and using wax for carburizing of steel. He has used chlorophyll as gamma ray absorber to protect Iraqi children from cancer and mechanically red beet juice as scavenger for poisonous heavy metal ions and anticancer and detoxification of urea and uric acid from human body via urine system. In 2013, he was awarded with Scientific Medal from Iraqi Government. In 2014, he got qualified as a Member in Who is Who network. He has been serving as a Reviewer of Journal of Advances in Polymer Technology.

 

Abstract:

A case study is carried out on the urine of a man with 40 years old. Two samples of urine are taken from the urine system one after drinking concentrated red beet juice (mechanically extracted) and the second one without drinking. Using Ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra measurements was done, the results showed that with concentrated juice the absorption bands are shifted toward low energy due to the hydrogen bond formation by exchangeable proton from the juice (anthocyanin pigments) to the lone pair of electrons on the oxygen and nitrogen atoms in uric acid and urea and vice versa which shifted the n-p* absorption band to the lower energy, while dilution the above sample spectrum shows shifting to the higher energy, this is due to the low hydrogen bonding formation with uric acid and urea due to the low concentration of exchangeable proton upon dilution, as well as water is a good hydrogen bonding competitor. From ultraviolet-visible spectra we conclude that absorption band shifted to the lower energy with drinking concentrated juice and to the higher energy with diluted one which reflects the importance of concentration of the juice on hydrogen bonding formation and on the enhancing of detoxification of uric acid and urea from the blood, thus we recommended high concentration juice which can obtain from red beet (highest concentration of anthocyanin than other fruit). Dilution of pure urine sample does not affect its spectrum; this is because water is already present in urine in a good quantity comparing with uric acid and urea concentrations thus no effect from more water. Results shows that with drinking high concentrated red beet juice viscosity, electrical conductivity and refractive index of exit urine decreased, which enhances detoxification process. The viscosity of urine with juice lower than viscosity of pure water which is 1.00 cP at 20 oC, this make urine+juice easier to flow through urine system than water alone. The pP of urine after drinking the juice is increased; this is due to the capture of the proton of uric acid by anthocyanin which is less acidic then former. The increase of pP results in lessens the tension of the human. The density of the urine increases slightly due to the more hydrogen bonding formation with the anthocyanin results in reducing the volume of the unit weight of the sample.

 

Keynote Forum

Ruey-Hwa Chen

Institute of Biological Chemistry-Academia Sinica, Taiwan

Keynote: Regulation of BIK ubiquitination determines life-death fate of cellular stress responses and anti-tumor activity

Time : 11:15-12:00

OMICS International Cell Biologists Congress  2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ruey-Hwa Chen photo
Biography:

Ruey-Hwa Chen has received BS and MS degrees from National Taiwan University and PhD degree from Michigan State University. In 2006, she relocated to Institute of Biological Chemistry, Academia Sinica to be a Research Fellow and promoted to Distinguished Research Fellow in 2012. She was also an Associate Professor and Professor at National Taiwan University. She has served as Deputy Director of Institute of Biological Chemistry in 2011-2013. She has received several awards, including Outstanding Scholar Research Grant, National Science Council; Merit Research Award, National Science Council; Outstanding Award, TienTe Lee Biomedical Foundation; TBF Chair in Biotechnology; the 59th Academic Award, The Ministry of Education; Merit MOST Research Fellow Award and Taiwan Outstanding Women in Science, Wu Chien-Shiung Education Foundation. Her current research focuses on protein ubiquitination in tumorigenesis and tumor progression and protein ubiquitination in autophagy.

 

Abstract:

The BH3-only pro-apoptotic protein BIK is regulated by ubiquitin-proteasome system. However, the underlying mechanism of this regulation and its physiological functions remain elusive. Here, we identify a BIK ubiquitination/degradation mechanism mediated by ubiquitin ligase Cul5ASB11. Under ER stress, ASB11 is transcriptionally activated by IRE1/XBP1 axis of unfolded protein responses, which results in an enhancement of BIK ubiquitination and proteolysis. Conversely, genotoxic agents act through p53 to down-regulate IRE1 and ASB11, thereby stabilizing BIK. These opposite regulations of ASB11-medaited BIK ubiquitination participate in part to the cell adaptation to ER stress and DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Finally, IRE1 inhibitors stabilize the active form of BIK and increase its anti-tumor efficacy in triple negative breast cancers. Together, our study identifies a BIK ubiquitin ligase, uncovers the opposite regulations of this BIK ubiquitination by ER stress and DNA damage, and exploits the targeting of BIK ubiquitination pathway combined with active BIK for cancer therapy.

 

OMICS International Cell Biologists Congress  2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Tomohiko Utsuki photo
Biography:

Tomohiko Utsuki has obtained his PhD in Health Science from Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan. He is currently an Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Tokai University, Japan. His research interest is in automatic control of physiological state for future medical treatment; especially he has developed an automatic control system of brain temperature and applied it to patients for clinical hypothermia in the intensive care unit of Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Medical Hospital. Presently, he is constructing models of cerebral blood flow, intracranial pressure and brain temperature in consideration of their distribution in brain tissue in order to develop an automatic integrated control system of brain's physiological state for more advanced brain resuscitation treatment.

 

Abstract:

In operating room, emergency room and intensive care unit, medical staff have so heavy burden that they can't sometimes have enough time and attention for clinical treatment. Especially, many routine tasks, which demand advanced knowledge and skills to medical staff, are required for the management of physiological state pertinent to life-support. Thus, it is very useful to develop and apply automatic control systems of physiological state for alleviating such burden in clinical treatment. A few of systems have been developed and attempted to apply to patients in clinical treatment, such as automatic control systems of blood-sugar level, hemoglobin oxygen saturation in artery and concentration of carbon dioxide in alveoli. Notably, an automatic control system of brain temperature was developed and clinically applied. The designing and development of such system usually require a model of relevant physiological state as the controlled object in the simulation test of the system or as the element added in the system's controller, because heuristic system designing based on experiments on animals is not allowed ethically. On the stage of basic development, even if a system is designed by a method without using model, such as ‘Fictitious Reference Iterative Tuning’, a model of physiological state is necessary for verification of the system by simulation. In this presentation, various automatic control systems of physiological state are presented including each model used in the development. Moreover, a model of cerebral blood circulation and extracellular fluid migrations in cerebral tissue are explained, which are constructed as the elements of the integrative model of brain’s physiological state. This integrative model is required for developing an integrated control system, by which intracranial pressure, cerebral blood flow and brain temperature will be automatically controlled in consideration of the mutual effects for advanced brain resuscitation.

 

  • Special Session
Location: CRYSTAL
Speaker
Biography:

Joel I Osorio is the CEO and Founder of Biotechnology and Regenerative Medicine at RegenerAge International™. He is the Vice President of International Clinical Development for Bioquark, Inc. and Chief Clinical Officer at ReAnima™ Advanced Biosciences. He is an Advance Fellow by the American Board of Anti-Aging and Regenerative Medicine (A4M), Visiting Scholar at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Dermatology) and Fellow in Stem Cell Medicine by the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine and University of South Florida.

 

 

Abstract:

As it has been previously demonstrated that coelectroporation of Xenopus laevis frog oocytes with normal cells and cancerous cell lines induces the expression of pluripotency markers and in experimental murine model studies, mRNA extract (Bioquantine®) purified from intra and extra-oocyte liquid phases of electroporated oocytes showed potential as a treatment for a wide range of conditions, including Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) among others. The current study observed beneficial changes with Bioquantine® administration in a patient with a severe SCI. Pluripotent stem cells have therapeutic and regenerative potential in clinical situations CNS disorders even cancer. One method of reprogramming somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells is to expose them to extracts prepared from Xenopus laevis oocytes. The positive human findings for spinal cord injury with the results from previous animal studies with experimental models of traumatic brain injury and SCI respectively as our evidence and due to ethical reasons, legal restrictions and a limited number of patients, we were able to treat only a very small number of patients, deciding to include in our protocol the RestoreSensor SureScan to complete it. Based on the electrical stimulation for rehabilitation and regeneration after spinal cord injury published by Hamid and MacEwan, we designed an improved delivery method for the in situ application of MSCs and Bioquantine® in combination with the RestoreSensor® SureScan®. To the present day the patient who suffered a complete section of spinal cord at T12-L1 shows an improvement in sensitivity, strength in striated muscle and smooth muscle connection, 13 months after the first treatment and 6 months after the placement of RestoreSensor® at the level of the lesion, showing an evident improvement on his therapy of physical rehabilitation (legs movement) on crawling forward and backwards and standing on his feet for the first time and showing a progressively important functionality on both limbs.

 

 

 

  • Neurobiology | Structural and Cell Biology | Chemical Biology| Systems Biology | Immunology | Nano Engineering | Stem cell biology and Regenerative medicine| Bio Physics and Structural Biology | Bio-Engineering | Computational Structural Biology | Structural Biology in Drug Discovery | Data Mining in Structural Biology | Cardiac cell biology | Cancer Biology | Structural Biochemistry
Location: CRYSTAL

Session Introduction

Xiongwu Wu

National Institutes of Health Bethesda, USA

Title: New Structure And Energy Cycles Of Kinesin Dimers Walking On Microtubules Revealed From Molecular Simulations

Time : 13:45- 14:15

Speaker
Biography:

Xiongwu Wu has his expertise in molecular simulation and method development. He developed Self-Guided Molecular/Langevin Dynamics simulation (SGMD/SGLD) methods that enable molecular simulation to access long-time scale events. He has developed core-weighted grid-threading method for rigid fitting of proteins into low resolution cryo-EM maps and Map-restrained SGLD (MapSGLD) method to flexible fit protein structures into cryo-EM maps. He is also the developer for both molecular simulation and modeling packages AMBER and CHARMM

Abstract:

Kinesins are motor proteins that move unidirectionally along microtubules as they hydrolyze ATP. Although the general features of the kinesin walking mechanism are becoming increasingly clear, some key questions remain unanswered, such as how they convert the chemical energy of ATP into mechanical energy and walk processively. In this study, through molecular simulations and free energy calculations, we found that in aqueous solution, kinesin favors an extended form with its microtubule-binding interface (MTBI) motif unfolded, as seen in a recent X-ray structure of kinesin-8. Through the flexible fitting of two newly released cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) maps, we derived atomic structures of the kinesin dimer-microtubule complexes in both two-head-bound and one-head bound states. Free energy calculations showed that kinesin bound to microtubules has a lower free energy than the extended form and that the free energy difference is in the range of the free energy released by ATP hydrolysis. The transition between the extended and compact forms, the structural differences of the leading and trailing heads and atomic force simulations lead us to a completely new mechanism by which kinesin dimers walk on microtubules.

 

Wolfgang B Fischer

National Yang-Ming University, Taiwan

Title: Structural modeling of membrane proteins from viruses

Time : 14:15 -14:45

Speaker
Biography:

Wolfgang Fischer is a Professor at the Institute of Biophotonics, School of Biomedical Science and Engineering, National Yang-Ming University, Taiwan. He has obtained his PhD in Chemistry at Heidelberg University, Germany, working in the field of vibrational spectroscopy in 1991. He has worked for years in USA like in Boston University as Postdoctoral Fellow working on bacteriorhodopsin using vibrational spectroscopy; Germany in Analytical Chemistry, working on ion channels as potential biosensors; Oxford University as EU Marie Curie Research Fellow and later as Lecturer, working on viral ion channels using bilayer recordings and molecular dynamics simulations and later moved to Taiwan. His field of research is on biophysical aspects describing dynamics and energetic of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) of membrane proteins. The focus is on the development of computational platform technologies to support structural modeling for drug discovery and design as well as for materials sciences.

 

Abstract:

Computational methods comprise a valuable tool to close the sequence-structure gap, especially for membrane proteins. At this stage, secondary structure prediction programs are available to identify putative stretches of helical transmembrane domains (TMDs) while few programs are developed to predict a beta sheet fold as the membrane spanning motif. With the knowledge about the putative TMDs, here adopting a helical motif, at hand these TMDs can be assembled into a tertiary structure and finally into putative quaternary structures using docking approaches. As a test case, viral channel forming proteins (VCPs), sometimes also called viroporins, are used to develop strategies to generate plausible structures. VCPs are about five time smaller than human ion channels and therefore used as a miniaturized system to investigate how ion channels are formed. Using E5 protein of human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16), the assembly of a polytopic membrane protein with three TMDs is presented in its hexameric form. Using a docking approach, the monomeric form is generated first before assembling into the hexamer. The quality of the model is assessed using potential of mean force calculations (PMF) identifying weak ion selectivity. Principle component analysis (PCA) of the data from a classical molecular dynamics simulation reveal asymmetric dynamics of the monomers. These dynamics are compared with those derived for other VCPs such as polytopic p7 of hepatitis C virus (HCV) with two TMDs and bitopic M2 of influenza A. Finally, coarse grained simulations are applied to probe the formation of the quaternary structure of e.g., Vpu of HIV-1.

 

Anil Batta

Govt. Medical College-Amritsar, India

Title: Problems of mental adaptation in patients with diabetic foot syndrome

Time : 14:45-15:15

Speaker
Biography:

Anil Batta is presently an Associate Professor and Senior Consultant in Govt. Medical College, Amritsar, Punjab, India. He has received his MBBS and MD in Medical Biochemistry from Govt. Medical College, Patiala in 1984 and 1991, respectively. His research interest is mainly in clinical application especially cancer and drug de-addiction. He has supervised more than 15 MD, MSc and Doctorate researches and published more than 30 international research papers. He is the Chief-Editor of America’s Journal of Biochemistry. He is also working as an Advisor to the Editorial Board of International Journal of Biological and Medical Research. He is also a Deputed Advisor to Pakistan Medical Journal of Biochemistry. He has been attached as Technical Advisor to various national and international conferences in Biochemistry, also with hi-tech endocrinal, genetics and automated labs of GGS Medical College, Faridkot.

 

Abstract:

Aim: It is known that in patients with Diabetic Foot Syndrome severe forms of mental disadaptation are observed. They are manifested psycho-emotional disorders and poor treatment compliance. The aim of this work was to study the forms of mental disadaptation in patients with Diabetic Foot Syndrome and the role of psychological and somatic factors in their development.

Method: The following parameters: Levels of anxiety and depression, alexithymia, irrational cognitive principles, personality profile, severity of somatic disorders and treatment compliance were studied in 120 Diabetic Foot Syndrome patients.

Result: The study revealed two main groups of patients with various forms of mental disadaptation and some relationship of psycho-emotional and somatic disorders. In the first patient’s group with severe form mental disadaptation, there were observed high level of alexithymia, depression, the prevalence of psychopathic personality types, combined with deep encephalopathy, cognitive disorders and long duration of disease. A poor compliance of treatment, the progressive deterioration of the disease, large number of lower limb amputations was observed also in this group of patients. In the second patients’ group with less severe form of mental disadaptation, there were observed small level of alexithymia, high anxiety and the prevalence of neurotic personality types and a shorter duration of disease. A good treatment compliance and smaller number of lower limb amputation was also observed in this group of patients.

 

Whitney Yin

University of Texas Medical Branch, USA

Title: Communication between DNA synthesis and proofreading in mitochondrial DNA polymerase

Time : 15:15-15:45

Speaker
Biography:

Whitney Yin is an Assistant Professor for University of Texas Medical Branch, USA. She has received Doctoral degree (PhD) in Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology. She is the Editorial Board Member of many peer reviewed journals and has many publications in national and international journals to her credit. She is committed to highest standards of excellence and it proves through her authorship of many books.

 

Abstract:

Like all high-fidelity DNA polymerases, human mitochondrial DNA polymerase, Pol-g contains polymerization (pol) activity for DNA synthesis and proofreading exonuclease (exo) activity for error correction. Pol-g is a holoenzyme consists of a catalytic subunit Pol-gA and accessory subunit Pol-gB. Pol-gA contains all enzymatic activity including pol, exo and deoxyribose phosphate (dRP) lyase, Pol-gB contains no enzymatic activity of its own but regulates all Pol-gA activates, consequently, the holoenzyme has higher processive and elevated dRP lyase activity. We determined crystal structures of Pol-g ternary complex with primer/template DNA and an incoming nucleotide to understand how the two active sites communicate with each other. The ternary complex reveals a b-hairpin situated between the two active sites in Pol-gA could transfer the information of nucleotide misincorporation in the pol site to the exo site 40Å away for excision. Our enzymatic studies indicate that Pol-g variants in the b-hairpin completely abolish pol activity while retains full exo activity. Additionally, we performed molecular simulation and found the hairpin region are energetically destabilized with perturbation of Pol-g variants in either pol or exo active sites, revealing for the first time that the two active sites are energetically coupled and DNA strand shuttling is accompanied by destabilization of the path connecting the pol and exo sites.

 

  • Young Research Forum
Location: CRYSTAL
Speaker
Biography:

Lisa M Domke is currently a PhD student in the Helmholtz Group for Cell Biology of Professor Werner W Franke at German Cancer Research Center, Germany. She has prepared her Master’s thesis with one of the pioneers in cancer research, Professor Dr. Robert A Weinberg at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, USA. The nature of her degree in Biotechnology has allowed her to learn various analytical as well as light and electron microscopical techniques and to work in different fields of life sciences.

 

Abstract:

Mature seminiferous tubules (STs) of mammalian testes comprise the Sertoli cells and germ cells and are tightly surrounded by a special peritubular cell wall. Using biochemical, immunocytochemical and electron microscopical methods, we have determined that STs differ from all other epithelia by the absence of cytokeratin intermediate filaments (IFs) but are rich in vimentin IFs, do not contain major epithelial marker structures and molecules such as desmosomes or E-cadherin-based adherens junctions (AJs) but contain exclusively N-cadherin-based AJs. In Sertoli cells, we have found two new junction structures: (1) N-cadherin-based areae adhaerentes which often represent even very large areas connecting Sertoli cells with each other or with germ cells. (2) Special AJs arranged in closely and regularly spaced rows of tight junction-like structures and associated with 5-8 nm wide cytoplasm-to-cytoplasm channels (cribelliform junctions). The seminiferous tubule cells are attached to the peritubular wall by a well-developed basal lamina but lack hemidesmosomes and hemidesmosomal marker molecules. The peritubular wall is a stack system of layers of extracellular matrix (ECM) structures alternating with monolayers of very flat lamellar smooth muscle cells (LSMCs). These LSMCs represent differentiated smooth muscle cells (SMCs; positive for smooth muscle α-actin, the corresponding myosin light and heavy chains, α-actinin, tropomyosin, smoothelin, desmin, vimentin, filamin, talin, dystrophin, caldesmon, calponin and protein SM22α). The cells are laterally connected often in overlapping protrusions by AJs containing cadherin-11 as the predominant cadherin, and also P-cadherin and rarely N-cadherin, anchored in cytoplasmic plaques containing β-catenin, proteins p120 and p0071, plakoglobin and protein myozap. LSMCs also contain typical SMC structures such as dense bodies, plasma membrane-associated focal adhesions and caveolae. Thus, we conclude that these LSMCs represent a specific SMC type and not just myoid cells or myofibroblasts as stated in the literature.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Jacob Anderson C Sanchez is a Faculty/Researcher of the Pampanga State Agricultural University. His main objective is to conduct researches related to the development of Aglibut sweet tamarind using molecular biology techniques. He is passionate in conducting researches that are essential in ensuring the profit of the marginalized sector. He has also presented his various researches in international conferences at Singapore, Japan, and France.

 

Abstract:

Aglibut sweet tamarind is a priority commodity of the Pampanga State Agricultural University (PSAU). However, this variety looks like sour tamarind especially when they are still seedlings. This may result in potential economic loss for farmers or business capitalists who would venture in this lucrative business. Therefore, this study aimed to obtain their molecular identification using cpDNA (rbcL, matK) and nrDNA (ITS) markers; to determine the relationships of the samples using Maximum Likelihood and Maximum Parsimony Cladograms and to evaluate the universality of ITS, rbcL and matK in tamarind. BLAST results showed that majority of the samples belong to Tamarindus indica with 99-100% homology. Maximum Parsimony (MP) and Maximum Likelihood (ML) for matK showed that Aglibut sweet tamarind formed a monophyletic group with PSAU’s sour tamarind and paraphyletic to wild-type sour tamarind obtained from Lubao, Pampanga. On the other hand, MP and ML for ITS did not show a fully resolved tree. For the universality, results showed that matK had 100% PCR and sequencing success rates. Meanwhile, ITS showed 100% PCR success rate and 83% sequencing success, whereas rbcL did not work well for the samples. Hence, we conclude that DNA barcodes matK and ITS are the genetic markers that can be used for molecular identification of Aglibut and sour tamarind samples. More importantly, we report that Aglibut sweet tamarind has closer genetic relationship with the PSAU sour tamarind than other varieties

  • Video Presentation
Location: CRYSTAL

Session Introduction

Chantal Prévost

Institut de Biologie Physico-Chimique, Paris

Title: Structural insights on homologous recombination

Time : 17:00-17:30

Speaker
Biography:

Chantal Prévost is a Researcher at the Theoretical Biochemistry Laboratory (LBT) of the French National Research Center (CNRS), in Paris. She has developed a strong expertise in studying complex biological processes in silico via the integrative exploration of unstable macromolecular self-assembly substates. She has elaborated new algorithms for flexible macromolecular docking and protein fiber modeling. She presently applies this expertise to tackling the mechanism of homologous recombination as well as exploring the architecture of oligomeric assemblies, in collaboration with the Prentiss team in Harvard University, USA

Abstract:

Homologous recombination (HR) is an essential biological process common to all living cells that maintains the genome integrity by faithfully repairing double-strand breaks (DSBs). The HR process searches the genome for a region that is homologous to the broken DNA and uses this region as a template to restore the DNA integrity, via the capture of the complementary strand that gets paired with the damaged DNA. Nucleofilaments resulting from the polymerization of a recombinase (RecA in prokaryotes) on each damaged DNA strand recruit the genomic DNA, test it for homology and promote strand exchange. The coordination of dynamic stages with different time and length scales enables the process to be simultaneously fast and stringent. By combining docking explorations and molecular dynamics simulations at the atomic level, we have integrated the results from 30 years studies into new structural insights on the HR process. We propose a mechanism for the initial recognition/strand exchange phase, where more than 80% of non-homologous sequences are eliminated, that uses mechanical tension in the DNA to locally destabilize the base pairing interactions in the searched DNA and perform swift homology tests via pairing exchange. We also investigated the role of ATP hydrolysis in the slower phases of HR using molecular dynamics simulations. These simulations, based on the hypothesis that the filament can change the internal arrangement of its monomers upon ATP hydrolysis, revealed how hydrolysis may promote reverse strand exchange in the filament. This provides a structural interpretation to the observed destabilization of the strand exchange product within filaments where ATP is hydrolyzed.